Dr. Keith Casper Explains the Importance of Early Detection of Head and Neck Cancers

After losing her husband to tongue cancer a Cincinnati woman urges community members to take advantage of free head and neck cancer screenings offered by UC Health physicians. Dr. Keith Casper, otolaryngologist at UC Health explains, “these types of cancers are very treatable if detected early.” He describes some symptoms of head and neck cancers with persistent throat pain, a voice change that lasts for several weeks or a mass on the neck that doesn’t go away.

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Media Outlet:
Local12.com

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